Bin Weevils in the National News!

ello Bin Weevils,

Yes, I know I haven’t been blogging in a very long while, but I thought you would like to know that Bin Weevils is in the National News due to the fact that their advertisements encourage children to spend money. Below is the full article.

Phurple

Full article : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3210920/Adverts-clampdown-popular-children-s-online-games-Owners-Moshi-Monsters-Bin-Weevils-told-change-pressure-young-pay-extras.html

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Clampdown on adverts in popular children’s online games: Owners of Moshi Monsters and Bin Weevils are told they must change as they put pressure on young to pay for extras
Creators of two online children’s games ordered to change their adverts
Moshi Monsters and Bin Weevils put pressure on kids to pay for extras
The owners have been branded ‘irresponsible’ by Advertising Standards
The games, both made in Britain, are hugely popular and played by millions of children as young as six on smartphones, tablets and computers
By SEAN POULTER CONSUMER AFFAIRS EDITOR FOR THE DAILY MAIL
PUBLISHED: 00:56, 26 August 2015 | UPDATED: 07:25, 26 August 2015
The creators of two online games have been told they must change their adverts – as they put pressure on young children to pay for extras.
Tactics used by the owners of Moshi Monsters and Bin Weevils have been branded ‘irresponsible’ by the Advertising Standards Authority, which has ruled that the firms must now change the way they operate.
The games, both made in Britain, are hugely popular and played by millions of children as young as six on smartphones, tablets and computers.
Tactics used by the owners of Moshi Monsters and Bin Weevils, which were both made in the UK, have been branded ‘irresponsible’ by the Advertising Standards Authority
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Tactics used by the owners of Moshi Monsters and Bin Weevils, which were both made in the UK, have been branded ‘irresponsible’ by the Advertising Standards Authority
They are marketed on the basis that they are free to play.
However, they include so-called ‘in-app purchases’ – extra elements that carry fees which are charged to parents’ credit cards.
The ASA, in a landmark ruling published today, has said the games breached advertising rules covering social responsibility and rules which outlaw direct appeals to children over the heads of their parents.

It took action following a complaint from the official fair trading watchdog, the Competition & Markets Authority (CMA).
As a result, Mind Candy, the owner of Moshi Monsters, and Bin Weevils’ 55 Pixels have both agreed to change the wording of their in-app advertisements.
It was the brainchild of Michael Acton Smith, who has amassed a personal fortune of some £125m through the success of the game and was awarded an OBE last year for his services to the creative industries
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It was the brainchild of Michael Acton Smith, who has amassed a personal fortune of some £125m through the success of the game and was awarded an OBE last year for his services to the creative industries
The ASA’s Miles Lockwood said: ‘It’s crucial that the ads children see, hear and interact with don’t confuse, mislead or directly exhort them to make purchases.’
The CMA’s senior director, Nisha Arora, said: ‘Three-quarters of 10- to 15-year-olds in the UK play video games every day, so it’s clear that they are a significant part of children’s lives.
‘We are concerned that some games may directly encourage children to buy extra features during the game.’
Moshi Monsters was created in Britain in 2008 and has become an international phenomenon with an estimated 90 million users around the world.
It was the brainchild of Michael Acton Smith, who has amassed a personal fortune of some £125m through the success of the game and was awarded an OBE last year for his services to the creative industries.
The game revolves around the fact that children are encouraged to raise and care for a group of virtual pet monsters Diavlo, Luvli, Katsuma, Poppet, Zommer and Furi.
The monsters have been turned into toys which have been given away with McDonalds Happy Meals.
The company behind the game, Mind Candy, has also cashed in by releasing songs, a magazine and a film.
The ASA said: ‘Although it was possible to play the game without spending real money or sharing the game, certain activities required participation in a paid-membership system, which entitled members to additional benefits.’
Like Moshi Monsters, Bin Weevils has millions of subscribers and it has won four consecutive BAFTA Awards for Best Children’s Website
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Like Moshi Monsters, Bin Weevils has millions of subscribers and it has won four consecutive BAFTA Awards for Best Children’s Website
Youngsters were promised ‘cool extras’ such as ‘Super Moshi’ missions, extra habitats, access to new games and customisation of their virtual pet monsters if they bought membership.
The current fees run from £2.50 a month to £4.95 a month depending on how long people sign up for.
Given the millions of children involved, this amounts to a licence to print money.
The ASA said the wording used in the pop advertisements suggested children who signed up for the paid for membership would be ‘super popular’.
Youngsters were told they should ‘Join Now’ and that the Super Moshi characters ‘Need You’.
It said the games were effectively putting pressure on young players to purchase the subscription. It said the language amounted to ‘direct exhortations to purchase membership subscriptions’.
As a result, it said the game breached advertising rules covering social responsibility and rules which outlaw direct appeals to children over the heads of their parents.
Mind Candy has agreed to change the wording used in the pop up ads in response to the complaint and the ASA’s decision.
The complaints raised about the Bin Weevils game, which was also created in the UK, were similar to those made about Moshi Monsters.
Here children are recruited to adopt and care for virtual pets that live in the bins.
Again, children were encouraged to click on a series of advertisements to buy a subscription for various extras including hats and items to dress up the creatures’ nests.
Like Moshi Monsters, Bin Weevils has millions of subscribers and it has won four consecutive BAFTA Awards for Best Children’s Website.
The company behind the game 55 Pixels has agreed to change the language used in its advertisements in response to the findings of the ASA.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3210920/Adverts-clampdown-popular-children-s-online-games-Owners-Moshi-Monsters-Bin-Weevils-told-change-pressure-young-pay-extras.html#ixzz3juihkgv5
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I have now left Bin Weevils

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4 comments on “Bin Weevils in the National News!
  1. Mackied says:

    Hi Phurple! Thanks for posting. Unfortunately, this isn’t the website anymore, we now operate on themuddytimes.co.uk. If you want, I’ll repost this in your name there, or I could make you an account so you can post on there. What would you think to do?

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